Working Speech and Language into Daily Routines

Working Speech and Language into Daily Routines

Many parents find that with their busy schedules they don’t have extra time to work on speech and language skills. One solution to this problem is to work speech and language practice into your daily routines. There is no need to make a specific time “just for speech practice”.

Getting dressed, eating meals, bath-time and bedtime are daily routines. A goal that can be incorporated into these activities is sequencing then discussing what happens first, next, and last. Another goal is to request an item or labeling/naming items.

A good way to focus on specific sounds is to use a carrier phrase.

For example, if your child is working on the production of /f/ you can practice saying “I found a _______”. If your child is working on the production of the /k/ sound, you can practice saying “I can put on my _____”.

You can also work on specific sounds by using repetitive, “fill in the blank” techniques.

If your child is working on the production of the /s/ sound at the end of the words, you might say “we get dressed in our _____ (house)”; “we eat cereal in our ________(house).

Describing items and talking about the function of the item is another way to work on a language goal in everyday routines. You can discuss how things feel, smell, taste, and what you do with them.

If reading books or singing songs are already a part of your daily routines, then incorporate books or songs that have your child’s speech sounds.

For example, if your child is working on the correction of words that begin with s blends (e.g. sp, st, sw, sn, sm, etc. ), you might choose the following:

·  The Itsy Bitsy Spider
·  Twinkle Twinkle Little Star
·  Spot Books
·  The Very Busy Spider
·  Stick Man
·  There was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly

Remember that you don’t need to schedule a specific time to sit at a table and practice “speech words” or language worksheets. Most of the targeted practice your child needs can be incorporated into routines or activities that you are already doing on a daily basis.

Written by Rhonda Granger, MA, CCC-SLP, Speech Language Pathologist

If you have any questions or concerns, please call us  at (740-369-3650).

Check out another DSHC blog: More Apps to Stimulate Speech and Language Skills – Infants

By |2019-08-27T18:16:20+00:00August 27th, 2019|Education, Speech Language Pathology|0 Comments

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