Signs of Autism

Signs of Autism

Continuation of Previously Posted Blog, What is Autism?

If your child is eighteen months old, you should consider talking to your doctor if your child exhibits the following behavior.

· Doesn’t point to show things to others
· Doesn’t know what familiar things (cup, spoon, phone) are used for
· Doesn’t imitate or copy others
· Doesn’t have at least six words
· Doesn’t gain new words
· Doesn’t notice or react when a caregiver leaves or returns
· Doesn’t walk
· Loses skills that he/she had previously

If your child is two years old, you should consider talking to your doctor if your child exhibits the following behavior.

· Doesn’t use two-word phrases (mama up, want milk)
· Doesn’t know what familiar things (cup, spoon, phone) are used for
· Doesn’t imitate actions and words
· Doesn’t follow simple instructions
· Doesn’t walk steadily
· Loses skills that he/she had previously

If your child is three years old, you should consider talking to your doctor if your child exhibits the following behavior.

· Has unclear speech or is difficult to understand
· Doesn’t speak in sentences
· Doesn’t follow simple instructions
· Can’t work simple toys (simple puzzles, turning knobs/handles, peg board)
· Shows little interest in toys
· Doesn’t want to play with other children
· Doesn’t play make believe or pretend
· Doesn’t make eye contact
· Repeats what is said to him but doesn’t appear to understand what is being said
· Quotes lines from TV shows or movies inappropriately and out of context
· Falls down often or has trouble on stairs
· Displays hand-flapping when excited
· Loses skills that he/she had previously

If your child is four years old, you should consider talking to your doctor if your child exhibits the following behavior.

· Ignores other children
· Doesn’t respond when his/her name is called
· Shows no interest in make believe or pretend games
· Can’t retell a favorite story
· Doesn’t follow three-step directions
· Doesn’t use “you” and “me” correctly
· Doesn’t understand “same” and “different”
· Has unclear speech or is difficult to understand
· Doesn’t scribble or has trouble scribbling with a crayon
· Loses skills that he/she had previously

If your child is already receiving speech therapy, your child’s speech therapist can assist you by providing insight on your child’s overall development.

To be evaluated for autism, your child will need to have a developmental assessment. This will include testing and/or observation by a team of professionals consisting of a Child Psychologist, Speech Language Pathologist, and Occupational Therapist. Part of the assessment may involve meeting with a Developmental Pediatrician and/or a Neurologist. Ask your Pediatrician if they feel a developmental assessment is needed for your child.

More information on autism an be found here: https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/signs.html

By Laura Pierce, MA, CCC-SLP, Speech Language Pathologist

Check out our last blog: What is Autism?

By |2019-10-25T19:51:44+00:00October 25th, 2019|Occupational Therapy, Speech Language Pathology|0 Comments

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